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QUOTATION MARKS

See also MOTTOES, SLOGANS, SIGNS, and INDIRECT DISCOURSE.

1.Titles of the following are roman and placed within quotation marks:
    Articles from journals and books
Chapters of books
Comic strips
Essays
Exhibits
Lectures
Individual selections from albums, tapes, CDs
Maps (For NGS maps see MAP REFERENCES.)
Paintings, sculptures, other works of art
Pamphlets and leaflets
Radio and TV programs within series
Short films, cartoons
Short musical compositions—hymns, songs, etc.
Short poems, as opposed to long epics
Short stories, skits
Speeches

 It is not necessary to italicize foreign-language titles that are placed within quotation marks.

2.Words as words, coined words, or words not used in their defined sense are enclosed in quotation marks:
    "Fancies" is the name given them.
Mausolus gave us the word "mausoleum."
The word "grunion" is said to derive from the Spanish word gruñon, which means "grunter."
The "tail" in front ...

3.Called, classified, designated, known as, marked, titled: Generally do not use quotation marks around terms following these words except to indicate coined words, direct quotes, or words not used in their literal or accepted sense: school of fish designated blacksmiths; pot classified as a pipkin.

Do not use quotation marks around a term that follows so-called.

4.Appellations: Generally capped and not quoted if well established: Abe Lincoln, the Great Emancipator; Jenny Lind, the Swedish Nightingale. If less well established, enclose within quotation marks, lowercase: Perle Mesta, "the hostess with the mostest." His chief reward was to be dubbed "his rotundity."  See also NICKNAMES OF PERSONS.

5.When a quotation runs from one paragraph to another, do not close any but the final paragraph with quotation marks. Each successive paragraph begins with quotation marks.

6.Translations: See FOREIGN TERMS (sections 2, 3, and 4).